It’s that time of year again… The St. George Parade of Homes 2024!

It’s that time of year again… The St. George Parade of Homes 2024!

Here is what you need to know:

  • The Parade runs from Friday, February 16th through Sunday, February 25th.
  • Homes will be open from 10am – 7pm daily — closes at 5pm on the 25th.
  • There will be 30 homes located throughout Washington County plus 1 BONUS home.
  • When you purchase your ticket you will receive the magazine which contains the map/home addresses.
  • If you purchase your ticket on-line, you will be instructed how to obtain the map/addresses. Be sure to bring the e-ticket to any Parade home and you will receive a magazine and ticket lanyard. Maps and addresses will be available on-line, beginning February 18th to anyone who has purchased a ticket on-line.
  • You can also do a virtual tour beginning February 22nd – March 31st, 2024 when you purchase your ticket.
  • Wear shoes that are easy to take on and off as no shoes are allowed to be worn in the homes.
  • Wear socks (no bare feet allowed) and if you get there early enough in the week and day, you will be given a shoe bag to carry your shoes with you; however, bring an small bag just in case.
  • Parking may be limited at some locations so try to carpool if you can.
  • Weather can vary this time of year so be prepared for rain, random acts of snow and sunny days.

Welcome to our beauitful area! We look forward to hosting you to our town. If you need a bathroom pit stop, refreshments and/or reinforcements, please feel free to stop by our office, conveniently located off I-15 and the Sun River/Southern Pkwy exit: 4617 Pioneer Rd, Ste 100, St. George, UT 84790. We will have extra maps for you, water and snacks.

Enjoy!!

What We Eat and Our Environment Related?

What We Eat and Our Environment Related?

About 2 months ago I started eating a vegetarian diet and 2 weeks into that shift, I watched The Game Changers. It’s the new trendy documentary on eating vegetarian and how athletes perform. It was very compelling. Even my dad, who is a family physician and holistic doctor in Las Vegas, emailed the whole family to watch it. In this documentary, there was a 10 minute blip that by eating less meat, we’ll create a less toxic environment. It piqued my curiosity so I did a little researching.

The obvious fact was that the more whole foods and less processed foods we ate, the less waste and by-products we created. But did eating meat harm our environment? According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), raising animals for food is the number one source of water pollution. To feed animals for consumption, corn is primarily used. Corn is prized because it can be efficiently grown on vast farms but it depletes the soil and forces the farmers to use more pesticides and fertilizers. Of which eventually affect our water supply. For example, there is currently a “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico the size of 8,543 square miles where no fish or other animals can thrive because the amount of pesticides and fertilizers that have flowed out of the Mississippi River. In 2009, a study found that four fifths of the deforestation in Amazon rainforest could be linked to the cattle ranching.

Not all experts are convinced of these facts. Frank Mitloehner, a animal scientist from the University of California, Davis is vocal about his view that meat has been disproportionately linked to climate change emissions. “What concerns me the most is that, while livestock has an impact, the report makes it sound as if it was the leading source of the impacts. By far the use of fossil fuels are the leading source of carbon emissions,” says Mitloehner.

There is so much data and research to be found with compelling arguments that I encourage to do a little picking around and see what sits right with you. David Pimentel summarizes in Scientific America: “For those who can’t give up meat fully, cutting back goes a long way toward helping the environment, as does choosing meat and dairy products from organic, pasture-raised, grass-fed animals. ‘Ultimately, we need better policies and stronger regulations to reduce the environmental impacts of livestock production,’ says EWG’s Kari Hammerschlag ‘But personal shifting of diets is an important step.’”